Instrument types

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instrument-2014.png

Instruments are the "probes" in your scene. They gather light and generate the result images. No simulation can be run without an instrument.

You may define multiple instruments, for instance several cameras. The active instrument for the simulation may be chosen in the render settings.




Ideal rectilinear camera

Cornell box rendered with an ideal rectilinear camera
scene file

Summary

This instrument is a simple camera model, describing a perfect rectilinear lens with no aberrations, flat front lens, identical principal points and pupils centers. This is the most common camera model used in CG.

Link

Ideal rectilinear camera

Real rectilinear camera

Cornell box rendered with an ideal rectilinear camera
scene file

Summary

This instrument is a rectilinear lens camera model, with optical aberrations. It provides similar images than the ideal rectilinear camera, with extra lens imperfections. If aberration parameters are all set to zero, it will provide the same images.

Link

Real rectilinear camera

Spherical camera

Cornell box rendered with a sphere camera
scene file

Summary

This instrument is a spherical camera featuring equirectangular projection. It may be used for creating HDR environment maps for lighting in Ocean or many other image renderers which use the same environment projection.

Unlike many renderers supporting spherical image renders, this camera model supports depth of field effects.

Link

Spherical rectilinear camera

Orthographic camera

Cornell box rendered with an orthographic camera
scene file

Summary

This instrument is an orthographic camera featuring orthographic projection. It provides images similar to a standard rectilinear camera placed very far away, with a very long focal length, or to an object-space telecentric lens. This camera is not physically plausible, as it collects only light coming from a single direction, which means the amount of collected light is zero. This is equivalent to a zero aperture object-space telecentric lens. For this reason, the amount of light collected on the sensor is not in lux.s as with real cameras, but in lux.s/sr (equivalent to cd.s/m² or nits.s). This means that this instrument measures luminance directly and can be used as an exact luminance sensor.

Link

Orthographic rectilinear camera

Light-map

Cornell box floor rendered with an orthographic camera
scene file

Summary

This instrument collects light reaching a scene geometry. The scene geometry surfaces are mapped to the result image buffer using the geometry's UV coordinates.

Link

Light-map

Irradiance perspective view

Cornell box rendered with an irradiance perspective view, illuminance(Y) displayed in false colors with a log scale
scene file

Summary

This instrument creates a perspective image of scene irradiance. Results show how much light is incoming over the visible surfaces. Depending on sensor type, the computed value may be scene illuminance (Y), spectral irradiance, etc...

Link

Irradiance perspective view

Irradiance orthographic view

Cornell box rendered with an irradiance orthographic view, illuminance(Y) displayed in false colors with a log scale
scene file

Summary

This instrument creates an orthographic image of scene irradiance. Results show how much light is incoming over the visible surfaces. Depending on sensor type, the computed value may be scene illuminance (Y), spectral irradiance, etc...

Link

Irradiance orthographic view

Material irradiance

Summary

This instrument computes the average irradiance on surfaces for a set of materials

Link

Material irradiance


See also

Node types