Complex Light Sources – Ocean 2014 feature

Complex Light Sources – Ocean 2014 feature

Introduction

Ocean 2013 was developed mainly for outdoor scenes, with complex environment lighting models. It is able to use analytic polarized sky models, as well as high resolution, high dynamic range images, to light the scene, making it possible to simulate any outdoor weather conditions.

Ocean 2013 is able to simulate artificial lighting as well, by using emitting materials. They can be given any emission spectrum and a spatial modulation (or filtering) function, to make the object emittance non uniform. However, the light is always emitted uniformly in all directions, limiting the range of possible uses for lighting design.

Ocean 2014 leverages these limitations. It includes a generic light source model, with three main parameters:

  • The base emission spectrum
  • The position modulation function, allowing to make the emittance depend on position in space. For instance, a grey-scale image may be used for modulating the object luminance.
  • A distribution function controlling the dependence of light intensity with direction in respect to the object’s surface.

This will enable modelling of complex light sources, such as spot lights, or sources described by tabulated data such as IES files.

Feature preview

The following images were rendered in using various distribution functions for the light source. The performance is still the same and was not degraded by adding the emitter distributions.

Cornell Box, simulated with a uniform directional distribution of the light source, as in the original paper
Cornell Box, simulated with a uniform directional distribution of the light source, as in the original paper
Cornell Box, simulated with a cone directional distribution of the light source
Cornell Box, simulated with a cone directional distribution of the light source
Cornell Box, simulated with a soft cone directional distribution of the light source (constant intensity within the central cone, and falloff in a broader cone)
Cornell Box, simulated with a soft cone directional distribution of the light source (constant intensity within the central cone, and falloff in a broader cone)
Cornell Box, simulated with a distribution of the light source in (cos θ)^5
Cornell Box, simulated with a distribution of the light source in (cos θ)^5
Cornell Box, simulated with a very narrow directional distribution of the light source, generating a square highly focused beam
Cornell Box, simulated with a very narrow directional distribution of the light source, generating a square highly focused beam

Stay connected!

Ocean 2014 beta version will be released mid-October for free evaluation. The stable version will be released in December. Compared to Ocean 2013, it will include a lot of new features, such as:

  • Full graphical user interface, for editing materials, environments, instruments…
  • Native support for SketchUp files. Export by plug-in will no longer be required : just open your .skp file from Ocean interface.
  • Complex light sources with directional distributions
  • A material library system, and many base materials shipped with the software
  • Multiple environments and multiple instruments supported in the same scene, with an easy choice from the GUI.
  • Support for named views in Rhino, which are all exported to Ocean instruments
  • Support for perfect orthographic views, with Rhino compatibility
  • And much more!